WEEK 56

BOLIVIA WANTS ITS SEACOAST BACK

[WORLD NEWS ★]

BOLIVIA WANTS ITS SEACOAST BACK

Bolivia Chile Dispute

(P1) The International Court of Justice (ICJ), ruled on Thursday that it has JURISDICTION to continue hearing a DISPUTE between Bolivia and Chile.

(P2) Bolivia lost 400km (240 miles) of coast to Chile in the 19th Century WAR OF THE PACIFIC and has been LANDLOCKED ever since.

(P3) In 2013, Bolivia asked the ICJ to order Chile to NEGOTIATE Bolivia’s claim to be given access to the Pacific.

(P4) Chile argued that the case did not FALL UNDER the jurisdiction of the ICJ, but the ICJ judges dismissed that ARGUMENT.

(P5) Bolivian President Evo Morales said it was “a day Bolivians would never forget”.

(P6) The two countries have had limited DIPLOMATIC RELATIONS since 1978, and previous attempts to negotiate the redrawing of the border have failed.

(P7) Thursday’s ruling means the case can now continue to be heard by the court in The Hague, a process which could take many months, if not years.

(P8) Chilean President Michelle Bachelet was quick to point out that “Bolivia hasn’t won anything”.

(P9) “This ruling does not affect the TERRITORIAL INTEGRITY of Chile,” she said.

(P10) Chile argues that a 1904 peace TREATY between the two countries settled their border.

(P11) But Bolivia says high-ranking Chilean officials promised on at least six occasions over the ENSUING decades that they would sit down with their Bolivian COUNTERPARTS to negotiate Bolivia’s access to the Pacific.

(P12) Bolivia stresses that it does not want the ICJ to rule for or against its claim to the 400km-stretch of coast but that it only wants Chile to agree to negotiations, with the outcome to be decided by the two neighbours “by peaceful means”.

(P13) Eduardo Rodriguez, who is representing Bolivia’s case before the ICJ, said he was very pleased with Thursday’s ruling, which he called “an initial victory” for Bolivia. 

WORDS: 295

SOURCE: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-34347332

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. Why are landlocked countries at a disadvantage compared to other countries?
  3. Why do countries go to war over territory?
  4. Is your country involved in any disputes over territorial issues, such as OFFSHORE islands?
  5. Do you think that Chile will ever give the land shown on the map back to Bolivia?

EXPRESSIONS TO PRACTICE:

What do the following expressions mean? Practice using each expression in a sentence; extra points if you can use it in conversation.

  • Fall under
  • Diplomatic relations

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A DAY FOR RHINOS

[ENVIRONMENT ★]

A DAY FOR RHINOS

Rhino

(P1) Meet Nola, a 41-year-old northern white rhino that lives at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park in Escondido, California. She is one of only four remaining northern white rhinos in the world, and the only one in the WESTERN HEMISPHERE. The other three live in a SANCTUARY in Kenya. World Rhino Day, held on September 22, is dedicated to raising awareness of Nola and the less than 30,000 other rhinos left on Earth.

(P2) “Rhinos need our help today, not tomorrow,” Nola’s lead keeper Jane Kennedy said. “Last year we lost over 1,200 rhinos just in South Africa. If we continue to lose more than 1,000 rhinos a year, in 10 to 20 years all rhinos on the planet will be gone.”

(P3) Rhinos have ROAMED the earth for more than 40 million years, but they are now ENDANGERED because of human activity.

(P4) “Unfortunately, most animals are endangered because of human ENCROACHMENT,” Kennedy says. “Humans have either POACHED animals, or because there are over seven billion of us, we’ve taken up too much of the world’s resources.”

(P5) Poachers illegally hunt rhinos for their horns. They sell the horns for thousands of dollars per pound, to be used for art, jewelry, and decorations. Rhino horns are also prized as a key ingredient in traditional medicines, even though scientific tests have proven that the horns cannot cure illnesses. Experts estimate that one rhino is poached every eight hours.

(P6) Scientists are trying to find ways to prevent rhinos from becoming EXTINCT. In 1975, the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research started the Frozen Zoo, a program through which researchers have collected cell samples from more than 8,000 different animal species, including the northern white rhino. Scientists hope that by studying the rhino cells, they will gain greater understanding of the species, and will find ways to increase its numbers.

(P7) Jeanne Loring, director of the Center for REGENERATIVE MEDICINE at the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) in La Jolla, California, works with the Frozen Zoo. Loring’s research focuses on pluripotent STEM CELLS, which are cells capable of renewing and becoming any cell type. The Loring lab at TSRI is partnering with scientist Oliver Ryder of the San Diego Zoo to use pluripotent stem cells to repopulate the northern white rhino. Loring says that the goal is to start generating new rhinos through this method “over the next couple of years.”

(P8) Jane Kennedy describes World Rhino Day as “a celebration of rhinos along with an awareness campaign for everybody across the world to know that rhinos are endangered and need our help.” At the San Diego Zoo, children and adults are welcome to visit and speak with zookeepers to learn about rhinos.

(P9) But you don’t have to live in San Diego to celebrate World Rhino Day. It is observed around the world, with zoos and wildlife parks holding special events and programs to teach people about rhinos, enable them to see the animals up close, and inform them about the threats to the species’ survival.

WORDS: 502

SOURCE: http://www.timeforkids.com/news/day-rhinos/273771

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. Have you ever seen a live rhinoceros at a zoo or wildlife park?
  3. Rhinoceri remind many people of DINOSAURS. Why is that?
  4. Are forms of traditional medicine commonly practiced in your country?
  5. Do you think that research into animal medicine and reproduction will enable us to save many endangered species?

EXPRESSIONS TO PRACTICE:

What do the following expressions mean? Practice using each expression in a sentence; extra points if you can use it in conversation.

  • Endangered species

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THE WORLD’S POOR HAVE NO INTERNET

[TECHNOLOGY ★★]

THE WORLD’S POOR HAVE NO INTERNET

Internet in Africa

(P1) Efforts to increase Internet access worldwide are falling short of goals, according to a United Nations Broadband Commission report released earlier this week.

(P2) More than half the world’s population is still offline, according to the report, and growth in the number of people with access to the Internet is slowing.

(P3) The digital divide has become a CHASM.

(P4) Internet access in rich economies is reaching SATURATION levels, while about 90 percent of the people in the 48 poorest countries have none, the report notes. It appears that a backward trend in Internet access is taking shape. This year’s projected growth rate of 8.1 percent represents a drop from 8.6 percent last year, and a downward TRAJECTORY from the strong growth seen until 2012.

(P5) “The Internet in many countries is still seen as a PRIVILEGE and not a basic human right,” said Clair Jones, technology and broadband expert.

(P6) “INFRASTRUCTURE is limited and needs to be expanded, but the real BARRIER TO ENTRY is cost. For Internet to truly be available across the globe we, as a planet, would have to decide that digital equality is important enough to make Internet a public utility. We would need to significantly lower costs or make the Internet free for UNDERDEVELOPED countries,” she told TechNewsWorld.

(P7) Broadband access is critical for any country’s economy, whether it’s a new or an old economy, observed Anurag Lal, CEO of Infinite Convergence Solutions.

(P8) It has a direct link to the competitiveness of a country’s workforce, he said.

(P9) “The Obama administration, as well as previous U.S. administrations, understood the importance of developing broadband. They believed it was a utility that has to be encouraged,” Lal told TechNewsWorld.

(P10) One approach to reversing the approaching FLATLINE of broadband access could be a mobile and satellite broadband push. That could allow governments to bring service to rural areas that currently do not have access to infrastructure and likely will not in the near future, noted Jones.

(P11) “I would expect that we could bring broadband connection to most parts of the world by 2030,” she said.

(P12) Nearly 3.2 billion people — about 43.4 percent of the world’s population — will have some form of regular access to the Internet by this year’s end. That figure is up from 2.9 billion last year, according to the UN report.

(P13) The commission’s goal is to see 60 percent of the world’s population wired to the Internet by 2020.

(P14) “The world is a big place, and the BUSINESS MODEL has to make sense. Most [people in] THIRD WORLD countries do not have the income to support an Internet account,” said Michael Bremmer, CEO of TelecomQuotes.com.

(P15) “When you are worried about food, Facebook really is not that important,” he told TechNewsWorld.

(P16) For example, a mobile data plan in Brazil costs about 10 percent of average wages, he said, and in Africa a mobile data plan costs about one-third of average wages.

(P17) About 300 million people gained Internet access in the past year. But some 57 percent of the world’s population — more than 4 billion people — still do not use the Internet regularly or actively, according to the UN report.

(P18) LANGUAGE BARRIERS in some regions made it difficult for people to use the Internet even in areas where the technology was present. The world’s residents speak about 7,100 languages, but just 5 percent of those languages are represented online, the report notes.

(P19) “Even if we expand infrastructure and lower costs to make the Internet AFFORDABLE for all, there is still the difficulty of providing translation of the world’s languages so that the information is accessible for all,” Jones said.

(P20) The top 10 countries for household Internet PENETRATION are in Asia or the Middle East, according to the UN Commission’s report. For example, the Republic of Korea continues to have the world’s highest household broadband penetration, with 98.5 percent of homes connected. Close follow ups are Qatar with 98 percent and Saudi Arabia with 94 percent.

(P21) In contrast, the lowest levels of Internet access are mostly found in SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA. The Internet is available to less than 2 percent of the populations in Guinea, Somalia, Burundi, and Eritrea. The only solution in these regions is to tackle the cost of physically extending broadband infrastructure with the latest advances in satellite technology, the report suggests.

(P22) The most encouraging possibilities for spreading Internet access across the globe lie with more affordable technologies.

(P23) Google and Facebook already are trying to IMPLEMENT Internet solutions. Their approaches may give governments a less costly way to create a broadband infrastructure.

(P24) “Google and Facebook are trying to minimize the infrastructure problem,” said Lal. “They are using slightly different approaches: Google is using balloons; Facebook is using flying drones. Those are the only ways to wire parts of the world at a minimum cost.”

(P25) Both companies have met with some success in LEAPFROGGING broadband challenges to bring the Internet to the populations where nobody else has done it, he observed.

(P26) “Both are for-profit companies, so they want to get people to the Internet to reach their services,” Lal pointed out.

(P27) How connected the Earth can become depends on one’s definition of “connected.” If it means connecting every corner of the globe, that probably will never happen, said Bremmer.

(P28) Even after the broadband infrastructure is expanded, efforts will need to focus on making the service affordable and available to both men and women everywhere, said Jones.

(P29) When will the world truly be connected? “That is a good question,” said Frank DeMasi of Resolute Partners. “If we are talking everyone everywhere, I do not see it happening in the next 30 years.”

WORDS: 939

SOURCE: http://www.technewsworld.com/story/The-Rich-Get-Internet-Richer-While-the-Poor-Get-None-82530.html

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. Why is Internet access important for poor people in underdeveloped countries?
  3. Are the major challenges to worldwide Internet technical, financial, or both?
  4. Should Internet access be partly a government issue, or purely a private business issue?
  5. Why do you think South Korea has almost 100% Internet penetration?

EXPRESSIONS TO PRACTICE:

What do the following expressions mean? Practice using each expression in a sentence; extra points if you can use it in conversation.

  • Barrier to entry
  • Business model
  • Third world
  • Language barrier

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LIV TYLER FEELS LIKE A SECOND CLASS CITIZEN

[CULTURE AND ENTERTAINMENT ★]

LIV TYLER FEELS LIKE A SECOND CLASS CITIZEN

Liv-Tyler-photographed-in-012

(P1) Liv Tyler believes she has become a “SECOND CLASS CITIZEN” in Hollywood at the age of just 38 due to film-industry sexism.

(P2) Interviewed in More magazine, the Lord of the Rings star said lead movie roles that did not require playing somebody’s wife or girlfriend were HARD TO COME BY, despite the fact she has not yet turned 40.

(P3) “Thirty-eight is a crazy number,” said Tyler. “It’s not fun when you see things start to change. When you’re in your teens or 20s, there is an ABUNDANCE of INGENUE parts which are exciting to play. But at [my age], you’re usually the wife or the girlfriend — a sort of second-class citizen. There are more interesting roles for women when they get a bit older.”

(P4) Tyler, currently starring in the HBO TV series The Leftovers, joins Anne Hathaway, Meryl Streep, Emma Thompson, Helen Mirren, Sandra Bullock, Salma Hayek, and Maggie Gyllenhaal, among a growing group of HIGH-PROFILE Hollywood stars who have criticised the film industry’s struggle with ageism and sexism.

(P5) Hathaway, 32, LAMENTED recently that twentysomething actors were beating her to roles, though she admitted the sexist DYNAMIC aided her younger self.

(P6) “I can’t complain about it because I benefited from it. When I was in my early 20s, parts would be written for women in their 50s and I would get them,” she told Glamour. “Now I’m in my early 30s and I’m like: ‘Why did that 24-year-old get that part?’ I was that 24-year-old once. I can’t be upset about it, it’s the way things are.”

(P7) Tyler, whose high-profile big-screen roles have been FEW AND FAR BETWEEN in the past half-decade, said she missed film because television is so UNPREDICTABLE. “With a film, you have the script, and you know the beginning, middle and end,” she said. “With TV, they write as they go. I have no idea what my character is going to be doing … which is frustrating. Part of me loves it, and part of me hates it, having no control.”

WORDS: 343

SOURCE: http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/sep/24/liv-tyler-38-sexist-hollywood

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. Do you choose films or television to watch based on the actors who are in them?
  3. Actresses’ careers often used to be over by the time they were 40, but lately that has been changing. Why do you think that is?
  4. Many viewers and critics think that television is more exciting nowadays than movies. What do you think?
  5. Liv Tyler finds being 38 to be a challenging, “in between” age, but many men love being in their late 30s. What do you think is the best age to be?

EXPRESSIONS TO PRACTICE:

What do the following expressions mean? Practice using each expression in a sentence; extra points if you can use it in conversation.

  • Second class citizen
  • Hard to come by
  • High-profile
  • Few and far between

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VOLKSWAGEN HAS A PROBLEM

[BUSINESS ★★]

VOLKSWAGEN HAS A PROBLEM

Volkswagen

(P1) Volkswagen is confronted with a MONUMENTAL challenge.

(P2) The company has admitted that 11 million of its cars used illegal software to cheat EMISSIONS STANDARDS.

(P3) Now, many owners are demanding that the OFFENDING cars be fixed.

(P4) That’s EASIER SAID THAN DONE, and Volkswagen has already tried — and failed — twice.

(P5) Here’s the issue, according to the US Environmental Protection Agency: Cars with Volkswagen’s 2-liter TDI TURBO-DIESEL FOUR-CYLINDER ENGINES include software that detects when the car is UNDERGOING emissions testing and turns on a suite of pollution-control systems.

(P6) But as soon as the test ends, the controls switch off, leaving the engine free to emit up to 40 times the legal limit of nitrogen oxide, a highly polluting gas. According to the California Air Resources Board, Volkswagen admitted to using a defeat device during a September 3 meeting with the agency and the EPA.

(P7) The problem for Volkswagen is that getting the engine’s emissions IN LINE WITH pollution standards probably means SACRIFICING something else.

(P8) “Building an engine involves balancing four factors — performance, emissions, DURABILITY, and fuel economy,” explained Jake Fisher, Consumer Reports’ director of automotive testing.

(P9) Right now, VW has sacrificed emissions to create an engine that offers great performance, incredible fuel economy, and solid RELIABILITY.

(P10) “Whatever the fix is, it will likely sacrifice fuel economy and probably durability as well,” Fisher said.

(P11) So fixing the cars won’t be as simple as changing the software to turn on all of the vehicle’s emissions-control systems.

(P12) “We aren’t sure what the exact fix will be,” expert Matt DeLorenzo told Business Insider. “We also don’t know what kind of performance or fuel economy the car will return when the emissions control is turned on.”

(P13) Volkswagen actually tried to fix the problem using a software patch in December 2014 and then again in April 2015.

(P14) Neither attempt was successful.

(P15) As DISQUIETING as the recent REVELATIONS have been, Fisher claims that Consumer Reports research shows that many owners are still happy with their TDI diesels.

(P16) But this is not the case with everyone.

(P17) Those who purchased their TDI with the belief that they were taking ownership of an environmentally friendly vehicle feel deceived.

(P18) On the other hand, those who appreciate the performance, reliability, and fuel economy of the TDI will likely not accept a fix that would materially change the characteristics of the car they purchased.

(P19) This could lead to the NUCLEAR OPTION — a buyback of all the offending cars.

(P20) “Buybacks and forced buybacks enforced through a judgment are highly unusual,” attorney Eric Gibbs, who has filed a lawsuit against Volkswagen, told Business Insider.

(P21) Buybacks are EXCEEDINGLY rare in the automotive world because they call for the car company to spend millions if not billions to “buy back” defective cars from owners.

(P22) Manufacturers typically avoid this route due to the EXORBITANT costs and the negative publicity generated by the action.

(P23) According to DeLorenzo, there’s a 50-50 chance a buyback happens in this case, and it all depends on the fix VW comes up with.

(P24) “If the change in performance after the fix is MINIMAL, then it’s not a problem,” DeLorenzo said. “But if the change in performance is great, the LIKELIHOOD of a buyback increases.”

(P25) If there is a buyback of the 482,000 cars in the US, it would be the largest in industry history and cost VW billions of dollars.

(P26) VW owners aren’t standing IDLY by. They’re taking action through the legal system in the form of CLASS ACTION LAWSUITS.

(P27) “Volkswagen owners feel like they’ve been MISLED and deceived,” Gibbs told Business Insider. “They thought they were getting a clean diesel and paid a PREMIUM for it.”

(P28) Gibbs, founding partner of Girard Gibbs, is one of the many lawyers representing owners of the 482,000 cars in the US affected by VW’s emissions scheme.

(P29) According to Gibbs, more than 50 class-action lawsuits have been filed around the country, and that number could reach into the hundreds.

(P30) In the suit, owners are demanding a buyback or a repair that would not compromise performance, emissions, and fuel economy.

(P31) But the likely outcome of these suits isn’t going to be a buyback.

(P32) “Typically, settlements involve REBATES and certificates that would give owners a discount on a new VW or protection from a drop in resale value,” DeLorenzo said.

(P33) Either way, there’s no easy fix to this problem.

WORDS: 719

SOURCE: http://www.businessinsider.com/volkswagens-cheating-engines-cant-be-easily-fixed-2015-9

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. Do you think that the kind of deception that Volkswagen engaged in is typical or unusual corporate behavior?
  3. The US Justice Department could bring legal charges against Volkswagen executives. Do you think that any of them will go to prison?
  4. If you owned one of these cars, how would you feel about this situation? What outcome would you want to see?
  5. Is it important to you to own a “green” car?

EXPRESSIONS TO PRACTICE:

What do the following expressions mean? Practice using each expression in a sentence; extra points if you can use it in conversation.

  • Easier said than done
  • In line with
  • Nuclear option
  • Class action lawsuit

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HOW TO SPOT A NARCISSIST

[LIFE ★★]

HOW TO SPOT A NARCISSIST

vain-man-111202

(P1) Many of us hear the word “NARCISSIST” and automatically think about a SELF-ABSORBED person who constantly talks about himself—and yes, that’s a very IRRITATING (but small) part of it. A narcissist, by definition, is, “someone with a GRANDIOSE sense of self and little or no ability to EMPATHIZE with others,” says Joseph Burgo, Ph.D, author of The Narcissist You Know. This makes them hard to date. “They make INSENSITIVE relationship partners,” says Burgo. Nobody wants that, so here’s how to spot narcissists out there in the dating world.

(P2) Level One: How to Spot a Narcissist

(P3) Lack of interest and self-absorption are two big narcissistic characteristics, but rarely does anyone—narcissist or not—show those TRAITS on a first date (and if they do, run, girl. Run!). “While they may appear CHARMING when you first meet them, and may even appear very interested in you, they do so only to ELICIT your admiration and to build themselves up in your eyes,” Burgo says. It can be very difficult to know if he’s simply charming because he’s into you (normal), or he’s charming because he’s into you being into him (narcissist).

(P4) Important things to look for: “Narcissists view the world almost exclusively in terms of winners and losers,” Burgo says. Look out for him expressing this in conversation. “If he talks about third parties in a CONTEMPTUOUS or DISMISSIVE way, that should GIVE YOU PAUSE,” Burgo says. “If he brags about his accomplishments, or talks too much about how much money he makes, [that’s another sign].”

(P5) On a first date, you should get a sense of someone’s personality—and nobody’s perfect. So remember the golden rule: “If he seems too good to be true, he probably is,” says Burgo.

(P6) Level Two: How to Date a Narcissist (If You Dare)

(P7) So, you like him—but after a few weeks or months of dating, you’re starting to see those small RED FLAGS. All isn’t lost. The first thing you need to do is, “Remain humble and cautious; don’t let FLATTERY and the good feeling he tries to inspire in you blind you to his true nature,” Burgo explains.

(P8) Next, TAKE NOTE of how he acts and be honest with yourself about who he is. “Narcissists are often IMPULSIVE—they drink too much, spend too much, make RASH choices with little FORETHOUGHT,” says Burgo.

(P9) Finally, don’t “yes” him to death. CALL HIM OUT when he’s wrong, and pay close attention to what happens when you two disagree. “Narcissists have a very THIN SKIN and when their winner self-image is challenged, they typically respond with INDIGNATION, blame, and contempt,” says Burgo. “They will blame someone else for their mistakes…in order to INVALIDATE [that person].”

(P10) Level Three: How to Break Up With a Narcissist

(P11) If his behavior CROSSES A LINE, it’s time to CALL IT QUITS. “If you criticize a narcissist, he will turn on you IN A HEARTBEAT and SAVAGE your SELF-ESTEEM,” says Burgo. If he’s been making you feel bad about yourself, not respecting you, and not making you feel important, it’s probably because a narcissist only cares about one thing: himself.

(P12) When you see this, “Get away as quickly as possible,” advises Burgo. Otherwise, the longer you stay, the more you’re likely to make excuses or FALL VICTIM TO his flattery. Burgo has a little TOUGH LOVE to share: “Don’t deceive yourself that you can make him change. If you’re looking back on the early days of your romantic relationship and wondering how to recover that BLISS, forget about it,” says Burgo.

(P13) “Ask yourself why you want to remain in this relationship. Are you trying to recover the IDEALIZED early days when it all felt so perfect?”

(P14) It might be hard to answer these questions, but it’s important. “When a person remains in a relationship long after it has become obvious it’s time to end it, he or she usually has some unhealthy and unconscious reasons for staying,” says Burgo. Look at this (and any breakup, really) as a healing opportunity. If this person doesn’t treat you the way you deserve, stand up for yourself and free yourself up for someone who will.

WORDS: 695

SOURCE: http://www.glamour.com/sex-love-life/blogs/smitten/2015/09/narcissist-boyfriend-selfish-signs

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. Have you ever been in a relationship with a narcissist?
  3. The article is written for women and is about male narcissists. Are there female narcissists? What are they like?
  4. Do you think that there are more narcissists today than there used to be?
  5. Are “SELFIES” narcissistic, or are they just fun?

EXPRESSIONS TO PRACTICE:

What do the following expressions mean? Practice using each expression in a sentence; extra points if you can use it in conversation.

  • Self-absorbed
  • Give pause
  • Red flag
  • Take note
  • Call someone out
  • Thin skin
  • Cross a line
  • Call it quits
  • In a heartbeat
  • Self-esteem
  • Fall victim to
  • Tough love

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