What 3 Things Can I Do to Extend the Length of My Life?

Direction: After a short greeting, read the following article out loud with your tutor. Go over highlighted vocab/expression to make sure you understand everything. 

[Health ★★★★] What 3 Things Can I Do to Extend the Length of My Life?

 

(P1) Somewhere out there is a bunch of people who are going to live to be 100. In the U.S. alone, there were more than 77,000 centenarians in 2014. Still, that number is very small: centenarians represent less than a quarter of 1% of the entire U.S. population.

(P2) So how do you get to be one of them? You could invent a time machine, start your life over and do everything they did, or try to find a way to borrow their genes. Failing that, here are three things that longevity researchers recommend you start–and keep–doing.

STAY CURIOUS.
(P3) Once you’ve got a few years on you, it’s easy to think you’ve heard it all. But the idea that the world has nothing to teach you makes you stop asking questions–and that has consequences. “There is evidence that curiosity has longevity benefits,” says Laura L. Carstensen, a professor of psychology and public policy at Stanford University and the director of the Stanford Longevity Center. “Asking questions and discovering new things keeps you engaged with the world and with other people.”

(P4) Learning something new can be a form of problem solving: digging into an article about something unusual or asking a family member about her obscure doctoral thesis (and actually listening to the answer) requires you to exercise cognitive muscles that may have gone slack.

EAT WAY MORE PLANTS THAN YOU THINK YOU NEED TO.
(P5) The link between diet and well-being is something we learn early in life–and then forget over and over again until we die. That may be why so many people have diet-related diseases. In the U.S., nearly 28 million people have Type 2 diabetes, 86 million adults are prediabetic, roughly 1 in 3 adults suffers from high blood pressure, and a stunning 69% of adults are overweight.

(P6) So if there’s one thing worth drilling into your mind, it’s this: the healthiest diet is the one in which you eat a lot of plants. The celebrated Mediterranean diet is celebrated for a reason, with study after study showing that its focus on fruits, vegetables, nuts and olive oil is linked to a longer life.

(P7) A 2015 study of 450,000 European adults found those who ate a diet that was 70% plant-based–fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains and beans–had a 20% lower risk of dying of cardiovascular disease than other people. A Harvard University study found that people who ate eight or more servings of fruits and vegetables a day were 30% less likely to have a heart attack or stroke than people who ate less from the plant group.

(P8) Multiple studies on both laboratory animals and humans have shown that caloric restriction–following a diet whose calories are roughly 25% below the recommended adult daily calorie intake–can have life-extending benefits. That’s not the way most people would want to live, but replacing meats with fruits and vegetables can go a long way toward slashing calories in a more satisfying way.

RETHINK WHAT IT MEANS TO BE OLD.
(P8) It’s hard to feel positive about a stage of life when you spend every year leading up to it assuming that it’s going to be grim. That, of course, is a great way to ensure that grim is precisely what it becomes–but the inverse is also true. “Our research has shown that when more-positive beliefs about older individuals are held earlier in life, they can lead to health advantages,” says Becca Levy, an associate professor of epidemiology and psychology at the Yale School of Public Health. That, in turn, can mean a remarkable 7.5-year boost in life span compared with people who have negative beliefs about age.

(P9) That means remaining mindful of the contributions that older people make to others–and making those contributions yourself. There’s no reason to accept that seniors are all addled and frail just because so many TV shows depict them that way.

(P10) Mortality is nonnegotiable, which is probably what makes it seem so terrible. But the number of years you get–not to mention the way you spend them–can in many ways be up to you.

WORDS: 685

SOURCE: http://time.com/4673032/how-to-extend-the-length-of-my-life/

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly, summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. What are some things that the article suggest you do to extend the length of your life? How much of the suggestions are you currently doing?
  3. Can you picture yourself when you are in your 80’s? What would have changed from now? What kind of individual do you imagine yourself to be?
  4. Describe someone that you know that had a very long, happy life. How were they living their lives differently? What can we learn from them? Share your thoughts with your Cambly tutor!

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Why Employees At Apple And Google Are More Productive

Direction: After a short greeting, read the following article out loud with your tutor. Go over highlighted vocab/expression to make sure you understand everything. 

[Business ★★★★] Why Employees At Apple And Google Are More Productive

PHOTO: FLICKR USER ROGER SCHULTZ

(P1) Companies like Apple, Netflix, Google, and Dell are 40% more productive than the average company, according to research from the leadership consulting firm Bain & Company. You might think that it’s because these companies attract top-tier employees–high performers who are naturally gifted at productivity–but that’s not the case, says Bain & Company partner Michael Mankins.

(P2) “Our research found that these companies have 16% star players, while other companies have 15%,” he says. “They start with about the same mix of star players, but they are able to produce dramatically more output.”

(P3) It’s what they do with these high performers. Executives from large companies across 12 industry sectors worldwide said three components of human capital impact productivity more than anything else: time, talent, and energy. And the top quartile organized its business processes in a way that they’re 40% more productive than the rest and consequently have profit margins that are 30%-50% higher than industry averages.

(P4) They get more done by 10 a.m. Thursday morning than the others do in a week, but they don’t stop working,” says Mankins. “This difference compounds every year; over a decade, they can produce 30 times more than the rest, with the same number of employees.”

(P5) Mankins explores their methods and mindsets in his new book TIME | TALENT | ENERGY: Overcome Organizational Drag and Unleash Your Team’s Productive Power. Here’s what he found:

GROUPING A PLAYERS
(P6) The average company follows a method of unintentional egalitarianism, spreading star talent across all of the roles, says Mankins. Companies like Google and Apple, however, follow an intentionally nonegalitarian method. “They select a handful of roles that are business critical, affecting the success of the company’s strategy and execution, and they fill 95% of these roles with A-level quality,” says Mankins. “The rest of the roles have fewer star players.”

(P7) An example of how this can play out is Apple and Microsoft in early 2000s, says Mankins. “It took 600 Apple engineers fewer than two years to develop, debug, and deploy iOS 10,” he says. “Contrast that with 10,000 engineers at Microsoft that took more than five years to develop, debut, and ultimately retract Vista. The difference is in the way these companies chose to construct their teams.”

(P8) Apple used all-star teams because iOS 10 was a mission critical initiative. In addition, rewards were applied to team performance; no one person on the team could receive an exceptional performance appraisal unless the entire team did. On the other hand, Microsoft used a stacked ranking where 20% of every team got an exceptional review, and compensation was entirely based on individual performance. Microsoft eventually abolished stacked ranking, says Mankins.

(P9) “For every member of the team that is not a star player, productivity declines,” he says. “If 100% of the team is star players, productivity is extremely high.”

ELIMINATING ORGANIZATIONAL DRAG
(P10) The average company loses more than 25% of its productive power to organizational drag, processes that waste time and prevent people from getting things done, says Mankins. This often happens as a company grows, as the tendency is to put processes in place to replace judgment. Research published in Harvard Business Review found that organizational drag costs the economy more than $3 trillion each year in lost output.

(P11) The most common processes relate to expense management, says Mankins. “At most companies, there are spending limits and audits, and employees are tracked,” he says. “At Netflix, however, there is no expense policy. The only policy is, ‘Act in the best interest of Netflix.’ The company is telling employees, ‘We assume you are not here to rip off the company, and we’re not going to put in place processes that consume human capital, waste time, and zap energy.’ They tell employees to assume their best judgment, and they can be more productive if they’re not held back.”

INSPIRING LEADERS
(P12) An engaged employee is 44% more productive than a satisfied worker, but an employee who feels inspired at work is nearly 125% more productive than a satisfied one, says Mankins. The companies that inspire more employees perform better than the rest.

(P13) “We’ve been taught that you’re either a General Patton and can inspire others or you’re not, but this is not true,” he says. “Inspirational leadership can be taught. Companies that recognize that and invest in making it happen create meaningful impact on the productivity of their company.”

(P14) Dell Technologies recognized the productivity difference between inspired and average teams, says Mankins. “Sales teams led by an inspiring leader are 6% more productive than those that have an average leader. If you extrapolate that 6% it accounts for an extra $1 billion in annual revenue. Consider what [poor leadership] is costing your company.”

(P15) Individual talent is great, but it can’t turn companies into stars, Mankins says. “We could try everything we want to emulate the habits of highly effective individuals, but it doesn’t matter what we do individually if it runs counter to how an organization gets work done,” says Mankins. “Top-performing companies focus on collective instead of individual.”

WORDS: 839

SOURCE: https://www.fastcompany.com/3068771/work-smart/how-employees-at-apple-and-google-are-more-productive

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly, summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. What are some things that the high-performing companies are doing differently from the average?
  3. Does your company/organization have management policies or processes that are meant to encourage more productivity? How effective is it?
  4. Explain the time when you were feeling very productive. What were you doing, and what are some of the components that contributed to high productivity? Share your thoughts with your Cambly tutor!

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Is Spirulina a Miracle Cure-all?

[Health ★★★★]

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(P1) Arguably the “superfood” of the moment, spirulina is associated with a number of health claims, from curing allergies and candida to detoxifying the body and aiding in weight loss. Does this blue-green alga deliver, or is it all health hype?

(P2) As it turns out, these claims are backed by little science and likely surfaced due to spirulina’s impressive nutrient profile. One ounce or approximately 4 tablespoons of dried spirulina contains 81 calories, 16 grams of protein, 60 percent of the daily value of riboflavin, 44 percent of the daily value of iron and thiamin, 14 percent of the daily value of magnesium, and 11 percent of the daily value of potassium.

(P3) The Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database lists all health claims associated with spirulina as having insufficient evidence to rate and warns that women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should avoid it. There also is some evidence that spirulina could interact with anticoagulant, antiplatelet, and immunosuppressant drugs. Due to its high protein content, people with phenylketonuria, or PKU, should not consume spirulina.

(P4) After the Natural Medicines monograph was updated in 2015, a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial of 40 individuals with hypertension was published in 2016. It found that consuming 2 grams of spirulina for three months led to improved BMI, body weight, and blood pressure in this small sample. While spirulina is very protein-dense and these results seem promising, there is not enough information at this time to recommend it as a supplement for specific health conditions.

(P5) Due to its growing popularity, spirulina is cultivated in ponds and mass-produced all over the world, including Hawaii and China. Spirulina’s distinctive and strong seaweed flavor leads many people to consume it via capsule, while others mix the powder form into water, juice, or smoothies. Contamination by toxins and heavy metals is a serious concern, so it is important to choose a spirulina supplement with reliable third-party testing and quality assurance.

WORDS: 316

SOURCE: http://www.foodandnutrition.org/November-December-2016/Is-Spirulina-a-Miracle-Cure-all/

VOCABULARY: candida, hype, anticoagulant, antiplatelet, immunosuppressant, monograph, assurance

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly, summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. Do you take vitamins and supplements every day? Why or why not?
  3. In your opinion, do you think spirulina is safe and effective? Why or why not?
  4. In your opinion do you think the supplement industry should be regulated more? Why or why not?

READING COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS:

  1. Spirula is said to be a healing agent for ____________ and _____________.
  2. The nutrients that are contained in this alleged superfood is probably more of a reason than science that people claim it works. (T or F)
  3. It’s highly suggested that woman should not take spirula if they are ______________ or ____________.
  4. Spirula is packed with protein and studies have shown it could help with weight loss. (T or F)
  5. This supplement that is produced in masses has a strong taste of ____________.

EXPRESSIONS or PHRASES:

What do the following expressions or phrases mean?

  • health claims (P1)
  • could interact with (P3)
  • in this small sample (P4)
  • to consume it via capsule (P5)

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Image source: by THINKSTOCK.COM/KESU01 http://www.foodandnutrition.org/November-December-2016/Is-Spirulina-a-Miracle-Cure-all/

Delhi’s Jamia Millia teaching Bob Dylan’s songs as literature long before Nobel recognition

[Literature ★★★★]

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(P1) Literature and music enthusiasts across the globe might be debating the Nobel Prize for Literature awarded to iconic musician Bob Dylan but students at Jamia Millia Islamia have been studying his songs as poems in literature curriculum since 2011.

(P2) The 75-year-old American singer-songwriter was chosen for the coveted award last month for “having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition”, sparking off a debate whether songs qualify as literature or not. However, Dylan’s songs have been taught as literature in Jamia long before he was chosen for the prize. The varsity introduced Dylan’s “Blowin’ in the wind” in its MA English program in 2011 as part of the poetry paper “From the Victorian Age to Contemporary Times”, a compulsory subject for those studying English literature.

(P3) Other poets that are taught along with Dylan include Robert Browning, Ted Hughes, and Dylan Thomas. “Students respond interestingly to Bob Dylan’s literature. Around 40 students are currently studying the course that is taught in the third semester of the MA English program. We have been teaching how Dylan’s songs were used almost as anthems during the American Civil Rights movement in the 60s,” a faculty member of Jamia’s English department said. “However, with Dylan becoming the first musician to bag the Nobel Prize for literature we are hoping that more students from other disciplines will opt for the course under the Choice Based Credit System (CBCS),” he added.

(P4) Jamia, however, is not the only university to be teaching Dylan’s work as literature. Kolkata’s Jadavpur University also has some of his songs in the undergraduate curriculum. According to the Swedish Academy’s permanent secretary, Sara Danius, while Dylan performs his poetry in the form of songs, that’s no different from the ancient Greeks, whose works were often performed to music, a “great majority” on the 18-member jury panel had voted for him.

WORDS: 309

SOURCE: http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report-delhi-s-jamia-millia-teaching-bob-dylan-s-songs-as-literature-long-before-nobel-recognition-2277515

VOCABULARY: coveted, varsity (Indian English), compulsory, anthems, permanent secretary, jury panel

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly, summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. In your opinion, do you think Bob Dylan should have received the Nobel Prize for Literature?
  3. Can you tell me some famous writers of literature in your country? What work or works are they famous for?
  4. What types of literature do you enjoy reading? Why?

READING COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS:

  1. Who could be arguing about the selection of the 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature?
  2. Which Dylan song has been used at Jamia Millia University for many years?
  3. Bob Dylan is known for his songs that were a part of the __________________________ in the USA in the 1960’s.
  4. So far, only Jamia Millia Varsity uses Bob Dylan songs in its classes. (T or F)
  5. Of the 18 members of the Nobel Prize committee, how many voted for Bob Dylan?

EXPRESSIONS or PHRASES:

What do the following expressions or phrases mean?

  • sparking off a debate (P2)
  • to bag the Nobel Prize (P3)
  • will opt for the course under the Choice Based Credit System (P3)
  • the 18-member jury panel (P4)

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Image source: by “unknown” AZ Quotes

The 10 Rules of Packing

[Travel ★★★★]

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(P1) When you’ve spent more than a decade on the road, you get asked some pretty interesting questions. The one query I get most, though, is about packing: what to take, what to leave, where to put it. I’ve taken a boatload of trips, but every time I get back, I know I could have gone even lighter. Let’s save you some trouble and start with the basics of my lessons learned.

The 10 Rules of Packing

  1. The Golden Rule: Take half of the clothes you were planning to bring and twice the money. I cannot stress how true this is.
  1. Take only what you can fit in a carry on. We’ve all lost luggage before, and it’s a pain. But when it’s 3 degrees in Poland and you’re rocking those horrible sweats you insist on wearing on long flights, hearing “as soon as we find your bag, we’ll send it to you” can really put a damper on your first day. And, no offense to the Polish, but having to buy an entire wardrobe in Warsaw might not be exactly how you want to spend your travel pennies. This also means you’ll have luggage with wheels, which is worth its weight in gold.
  1. If you simply must check luggage, ask them to put a “Fragile” sticker on it, which helps ensure your bags will be put on top of the pile and be first off the plane. Also, yours is not the only black suitcase, so slap a sticker or red ribbon on it — anything that will help you pick it out in the crowd. Think airport security is scary these days? Try making it through customs with someone else’s bag.
  1. Mix and match. Bring three shirts and three “bottoms.” That’s 9 outfits.
  1. Books are sexy. So are vinyl records. But save yourself the extra pounds and fill your Kindle with every book/country guide you need and stick to your iPod.
  1. Don’t be a diva. If you’re the type who has to travel with your own hair dryer (and won’t use the hotel’s), then I might suggest a weekend in the Smokies over the Alps.
  1. Jackets and sweaters take up a lot of precious bag space and weigh you down. Unless you’re going to Russia in winter, layers work just as well.
  1. If you can bear it, stay away from jeans. This is huge and I should have moved it up to number 2. They absorb dirt (and odors), are bulky and take days to air dry. Cotton and khaki are the way to go.
  1. If it’s important and can’t fit into your daypack, leave it at home. Stuff gets stolen no matter where you go. As big as a pain as it is, I am constantly carrying my computer, cameras, etc. on my back and in crowded places, as ridiculous as it looks, in front of me.
  2. Every country I’ve ever visited sells soap, shampoo, socks, and t-shirts. I.e. What you forget, you can buy.

(P2) One last thing: those plastic gardening shoes that somehow made it into the acceptable mainstream of fashion footwear? Do your country a favor and don’t take them.

WORDS: 532

SOURCE: http://intelligenttravel.nationalgeographic.com/2012/02/24/the-10-rules-of-packing/

VOCABULARY: query, boatload, golden rule, damper, diva, mainstream

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly, summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. Which of these travel tips do you currently do when packing your suitcase?
  3. Which of these travel tips will you start to do the next time you travel? Why?
  4. Do you have any travel tips to share?

READING COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS:

  1. The author of the article states that the number one thing to remember when packing is to pack fewer clothes and take more money. (T or F)
  2. If you have to check in a suitcase, ask for a ___________________ so it is loaded on the top and will be one of the first pieces of luggage unloaded.
  3. The author suggests to wear _________________ of clothes instead of taking heavy and bulky coats.
  4. What types of pants does the author suggest to take?
  5. When it comes to shoes, the author suggests not taking those so-called fashionable ______________________.

EXPRESSIONS or PHRASES:

What do the following expressions or phrases mean?

  • rocking those horrible sweats (#2)
  • spend your travel pennies (#2)
  • worth its weight in gold (#2)
  • mix and match (#4)
  • if you can bear it (#8)

Cambly Practice ButtonImage source: by Photo: Cyndi DiMicco/My Shot http://intelligenttravel.nationalgeographic.com/2012/02/24/the-10-rules-of-packing/

Woman busted smuggling teen refugee inside suitcase

[World News ★★★★]

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(P1) A young woman has been caught trying to smuggle a teenage African migrant hidden in her suitcase into Spanish territory.

(P2) Authorities stopped the 22-year old woman last week at a border crossing into Ceuta, one of two Spanish enclaves in North Africa, from neighboring Morocco.

(P3) A 19-year old migrant from Gabon was found concealed inside. The man was immediately offered medical attention due to the lack of oxygen inside the compact travel bag, Spain’s Civil Guard said in a statement.

(P4) Border control had become suspicious of the woman after they noticed she was carrying her luggage on top of a trolley, authorities added.

(P5) Spanish officials said the woman showed an “evasive attitude while going through the established controls and nervousness” while speaking to agents.

(P6) Ceuta along with the province of Melilla to the east, are Europe’s only land borders in Africa. Both enclaves have long been popular transit points for hundreds of sub-Saharan African migrants trying to cross the sea at the narrow point south of Spain.

(P7) This creative but dangerous method of concealment is one of several desperate approaches to illegal smuggling that the Spanish Civil Guard has faced in the past week on the Ceuta border.

(P8) Two migrants, a man and a woman from Guinea, were also rescued Monday after authorities discovered them hidden inside the dashboard and the backseat of a car, according to the Spanish Civil Guard.

(P9) The migrants were 20 and 24 years old, according to officials. The Moroccan man driving the vehicle, a Volkswagen, Golf, was arrested. The car had been stolen in Barcelona in 2015 and had fake Moroccan plates and registration documents, the statement added.

(P10) Meanwhile, at least 800 African migrants tried to storm a border fence into Ceuta from Morocco on New Year’s Day, according to the Spanish and Moroccan governments, Reuters reported.

(P11) Most of the migrants were prevented from entering Spanish territory. A handful of migrants scaled the six-meter high barbed wire fence, but were eventually helped down by cranes, Reuters reported. Dozens of Moroccan security forces were injured in the incident, along with five Spanish police officers.

WORDS: 348

SOURCE: http://edition.cnn.com/2017/01/03/europe/ceuta-morocco-refugee-suitcase/index.html

VOCABULARY: enclaves, trolley, evasive, dashboard, scaled, cranes

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly, summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. In your opinion, why do you think people go to extreme measures to migrate to another country illegally?
  3. Describe what you think it would be like concealed in a suitcase.
  4. Do you think it would be worth risking your life to be smuggled into another country? Why or why not?

READING COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS:

  1. The young man who was concealed in the suitcase was given medical attention because he was unconscious. (T or F)
  2. The authorities at the border, where the woman was trying to cross, notice irregular behavior from the woman because of the suitcases on the ____________.
  3. A male and female from __________ were saved from a _____________ car. They were hidden in the ____________ and ______________.
  4. What’s the name of the city where 800 or maybe more people tried physically enter from Morocco?
  5. How many security guards were injured in the attempt to illegally cross over into Ceuta?

EXPRESSIONS or PHRASES:

What do the following expressions or phrases mean?

  • while going through the established controls (P5)
  • had fake Moroccan plates (P9)
  • tried to storm a border fence (P10)
  • dozens of Moroccan security guards (P11)

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Image source: Spanish Civil Guard http://edition.cnn.com/2017/01/03/europe/ceuta-morocco-refugee-suitcase/index.html

Foreign Medical Students Face Difficulties in the U.S.

[Education ★★★★]

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(P1) International students seeking a medical degree in the United States face serious stumbling blocks. First, there is often a language barrier. Students from non-English speaking countries could have a hard time understanding their work or communicating with professors.

(P2) Also, a medical education is very costly. First, students must complete an undergraduate degree. Then, most medical schools require at least four years of study. After medical school, students do at least three more years of training in their specific medical fields. They do receive some pay for this work. In addition, many medical programs at public universities in the U.S. do not accept international students. And private universities have fewer openings, creating a great deal of competition.

(P3) However, receiving a medical education in the U.S. is not impossible. Fatima Ismail is proof. The 32-year-old from Dubai says she knew she wanted to be a doctor at a very early age. “I was always fascinated by the brain and how it functions, and I love working with children. There is a huge population of children with developmental disabilities that are not taken care of very well in the Middle East in general and my home country, in particular.”

(P4) So, Ismail completed medical school in her home country. Then, she applied to a residency program at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. Ismail spent time as an exchange student at Johns Hopkins during her time in medical school.

(P5) She says many of her fellow students applied to more than 10 or even 20 different programs. “It’s a very competitive process. Being an international medical school graduate, we have fewer chances to be accepted because the priority would be for the U.S. graduates. Having said that, it’s not impossible. All that you need to do is, basically, early planning.”

(P6) Planning is highly important for foreign students seeking admission to U.S. medical schools. Paul White is the director of medical school admissions at Johns Hopkins. He says some schools do accept students with undergraduate degrees from their home countries. But most, he says, require U.S. study. “So we say we want to see at least one year of additional coursework in any area in the U.S. just so we can see the kinds of courses they are capable of taking and how well they may perform in those courses. And there’s no question that if they do well in the U.S., and they do well on the medical college’s admissions test, then they’ll be eligible for admission.”

(P7) India native, Karum Arora, is in his fourth year of medical school at Johns Hopkins. He studies eye diseases. He also completed his undergraduate studies at Johns Hopkins, as well as a two-year research program in his field. Arora says the professors he knew in his earlier studies helped him gain acceptance to the medical school. “I can’t even express in words how great my mentors were during those two years. And they were at Hopkins as well, and they both supported me when I applied for med school, guided me through medical school, worked on projects, and are supporting me now as I apply for residency as well.”

(P8) School administrators suggest international students should apply to residency programs in the U.S. after completing medical school at home. Or they should begin their American medical education at the undergraduate level. But, officials say, even candidates with the strongest history of study will face fierce competition.

WORDS: 565

SOURCE: http://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/foreign-medical-students-face-difficulties-in-us/3628784.html

VOCABULARY: stumbling blocks, applied, fellow, eligible, mentors, fierce

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly, summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. Why do you think students want to study medicine in the USA instead of in their own country?
  3. Do you think it’s important to have mentors in life?
  4. Is there competition between students in your country to be admitted to universities? Why or why not?

READING COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS:

  1. According to the article, language obstacles occasionally occur with foreign students studying in the USA. (T or F)
  2. According to the article, a lot of public medical colleges accept international students and private colleges accept a handful of med students. (T or F)
  3. Fatima Ismail was an _____________ student at a university in Baltimore, Maryland.
  4. _____________ is extremely important for international students who want to be admitted into a medical university in the USA.
  5. Executives at medical universities in the USA recommend that international students complete _________________ in their home country before applying for residency programs in the US.

EXPRESSIONS or PHRASES:

What do the following expressions or phrases mean?

  • face serious difficulties (P1)
  • a great deal of competition (P2)
  • in his field (P7)
  • med school (P7)

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Image source: by Lynn Sladky AP  http://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/foreign-medical-students-face-difficulties-in-us/3628784.html