VICTORIA’S SECRET’S ‘PERFECT BODY’

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[Thoughts★] Thousands of People Want Victoria’s Secret to Apologize for ‘Perfect Body’ Ad

[H021a] Victoria Secret_1

(P1) But can it make a difference?

(P2) More than 16,000 people have signed a U.K. petition asking Victoria’s Secret to apologize for an “irresponsible,” “body-shaming” ad.

(P3) The lingerie company sparked outrage for a new campaign celebrating “The Perfect ‘Body.’” The ad copy is a riff on the brand’s “Body” lingerie line, but since the slogan hovers above the supermodels’ bodies, people say it sends the wrong message.

(P4) Dear Kate, an underwear company “made by women for women,” insists that the lingerie industry as a whole can and should do better. “As if women need a reminder of our society’s homogenous definition of beauty, the ad features ten models with almost identical body shapes,” its website reads. “The creators of the ad probably didn’t think twice about the message it is sending, and to us, it’s irresponsible marketing.”

Here is Dear Kate’s alternative:

[H021a] Victoria Secret_1_2

(P5) But can the petition incite change? Petition writers Frances Black, Gabriella Kountourides and Laura Ferris note that “we have yet to hear a single word from Victoria’s Secret! It can’t be much longer until they listen up and realize that they have some apologizing to do.”

(P6) Victoria’s Secret did not reply to TIME’s request for comment.

(P7) But the “Perfect Body” campaign is in line with past marketing efforts. Victoria Secret’s previous “Love Your Body” campaign (which also incited backlash) provides a stark contrast to companies like Dove’s take on promoting an ideal body image.

(P8) Some companies just prefer companies opt to promote “perfect bodies” rather than “real beauty.”

WORDS: 292

SOURCE: HTTP://TIME.COM/3551892/VICTORIAS-SECRET-PERFECT-BODY-AD-BACKLASH-PETITION/

VOCAB: [H021A] VICTORIA SECRET_VOCAB

TO PRINT: [H021A] VICTORIA SECRET

Discussion Questions

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. What are the 16,000 British citizens asking Victoria’s Secret to apologize for (P2)? Do you agree with their argument?
  3. “The creators of the ad probably didn’t think twice about the message it is sending, and to us, it’s irresponsible marketing. (P4)” Do you agree with Dear Kate’s argument?
  4. Do you think this petition can incite change (P5)? Why or why not?
  5. “The society tends to converge to a single image of beauty.” Do you agree or disagree with the statement? Why or why not?

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FAKE ILLNESS TO SKIP WORK

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[Business ★] Almost 30% of employees fake an illness and skip work

[B021a] Fake Illness_1

(P1) When your employees call in sick, there’s a good chance they aren’t really under the weather at all, new research finds.

(P2) Nearly 30% of workers surveyed said they have called in to work sick when they were feeling just fine, according to a study from CareerBuilder.

(P3) The most popular reason for faking a sick day? Just not wanting to head in to work. Specifically, 30% of those who have skipped work when they were not sick said they did so simply because they didn’t feel like going to work that day. The research also found that 29% said they wanted the day to relax, and 19% wanted to catch up on some sleep. For 11%, bad weather was a good enough reason to call in sick.

(P4) The study found that many employees are making up fake excuses even when it’s not required. Although nearly half of the workers surveyed said they have paid time off that they can use any way they like, 23% still feel obligated to make up an excuse for taking a day off.

(P5) But many organizations aren’t just taking employees’ word for it: More than 30% of managers check to see if their employees are telling the truth. The most popular ways of doing so include asking for a doctor’s note and calling the employee, the study found.

(P6) However, some businesses take things a bit further. The research showed that 15% of employers have driven past a “sick” employee’s house to make sure he or she was really home 15% of employers have driven past a “sick” employee’s house to make sure he or she was really home.

(P7) Faking sick days can have significant consequences: Nearly 20% of employers have fired an employee for calling in sick with a fake excuse.

(P8) Some employees end up outing themselves online. One-quarter of the employers surveyed have caught an employee lying about being sick by checking their social media accounts. Of those, 22% have actually fired the employee, but 54% were more forgiving and only reprimanded the employee for the lie.

(P9) Overall, employees in professional and business services and sales called in sick most often in the past year. On the flip side, employees in the IT, retail, and leisure and hospitality industries were least likely to call in sick.

(P10) The study was based on surveys of 2,203 hiring managers and human resources professionals, and 3,103 United States workers.

WORDS: 400

SOURCE: HTTP://MASHABLE.COM/2014/10/29/EMPLOYEES-FAKE-SICK/

VOCAB (testing-kr only): [B021A] FAKE ILLNESS_VOCAB

TO PRINT (testing-kr only): [B021A] FAKE ILLNESS

Discussion Questions

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. What is the most popular reason for faking a sick day according to the article (P3)?
  3. Why are some employees making up fake excuses even when it’s not required (P4)? And how do employers take the fake excuses (P5-8)?
  4. Why do you think employees in some industries call in sick more than other (P9)?
  5. In your country, can you take paid leave without feeling obligated to make up an excuse to take a day off? If you were the employer, what changes would you make to your company’s policy for paid leave after seeing the statistics?

Did you like this article? You can connect to Cambly tutor by clicking the image below, or simply send the article’s link to the tutor when you begin your class.

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TRUTH ABOUT ONLINE HARASSMENT

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[Technology★]This Study Reveals An Interesting Truth About How Men And Women Are Harassed Online

[T20b] Online Harrassment_1_pic2

(P1) The Pew Research Center on Wednesday released a study about online harassment. According to the study, which asked 2,849 people about different forms of online harassment, 73% of respondents said they’ve seen someone else being harassed, whereas 40% of people say they experienced it for themselves.

(P2) The study breaks up the harassment into two categories: less-severe harassment, such as name-calling and embarrassment. The other type of harassment is more severe: stalking, sexual harassment, and being the target of personal threats.

[T20b] Online Harrassment_1_pic

(P3) Overall, men are actually more likely than women to experience some type of online harassment — 44% vs. 37%. Men experience name-calling and are more likely to be targets of physical threats, according to the study. Women, however, are more likely to experience much harsher types of harassment, such as sexual harassment and stalking.

(P4) But it gets worse for women. According to the study, “Women were more likely than men to find their most recent experience with online harassment extremely or very upsetting — 38% of harassed women said so of their most recent experience, compared with 17% of harassed men.”

(P5) And, according to the study, young women, ages 18-24, are the most likely to experience “severe” harassment, with 26% saying they have been stalked online, 25% saying they were targets of online sexual harassment, and 23% saying they were physically threatened.

(P6) Online harassment has been in the spotlight recently — particularly in the gaming community, in light of the GamerGate controversy. The Pew study says 16% of respondents were harassed in an online gaming community, and in terms of gender, 44% of respondents said gaming sites are more welcoming toward men.

(P7) The study was conducted in June, however, which is before the GamerGate controversy began.

WORDS: 283

SOURCE HTTP://WWW.BUSINESSINSIDER.COM/PEW-STUDY-ON-ONLINE-HARASSMENT-2014-10

VOCAB (TESTING-KR ONLY): [T20B] ONLINE HARRASSMENT_VOCAB

TO PRINT (TESTING-KR ONLY): [T20B] ONLINE HARRASSMENT

Discussion Questions

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. Describe different kinds of online harassment men and women experience (P3&4). How many (in percentages) are experiencing “severe” harassment and why?
  3. Why has been online harassment been in the spotlight recently? (You can do your own research but the information is included in the pdf as well)
  4. Has online harassment or trolling ever been brought up as a social issue in your country? Have you experienced online harassment? What do you think about GamerGate Controversy? Share your perspective with the tutor!

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THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ‘GOOD ON PAPER’ AND ‘GOOD FOR YOU’

Comment


[Life★] The Difference Between “Good on Paper” and “Good For You”

[L020b] Good on Paper_1_pic

(P1) If you’re on Match.com or any other online dating site like my friend J, you’ve likely already learned this lesson: Men who look good on paper don’t always look good in your life. “He’s attractive, got a good job, loves dogs—but something’s just missing,” J usually laments to me after each date.

(P2) I have another friend whose male BFF is also paper-perfect: He’s wickedly smart, funny, compassionate and giving. He’s got a great job that pays well. He even likes cats, and she’s a #catlady. She’s known him for eight years, and I can tell you that while he’d date her in a hot-minute, she’d never give him a second romantic glance. Something’s just missing, she’d say.

(P3) Call it chemistry or magic, but there’s something you just can’t manufacture no matter how paper-perfect someone appears.

(P4) Sometimes, we women wish we could force ourselves to fall for the good-on-paper guy, especially those of us whose hearts go pitter-patter for bad-boy types. (Beware: Bad boys who’ve falsified their romantic resumes so that they appear good on paper.) But alas, if he’s not “good for you,” it doesn’t matter how hard we try.

(P5) So what does “good for you” really mean? A “good for you” guy makes you laugh, deep in your belly. He shares your values. He makes your toes curl in pleasure. A “good for you” guy takes your breath away without even trying. He is considerate of your feelings. He turns you on in a turn of phrase. In other words, a “good for you” guy is everything you can’t possibly see on paper.

(P6) That doesn’t mean a “good for you” guy can’t also be good on paper—of course he can! I just mean that there’s no way to tell from a piece of paper if a guy will end up being good for you, no matter how impressive his credentials.

(P7) Have you ever tried to date a “good on paper” guy and it didn’t work out? Was the “good for you” guy you dated also good on paper, or not so much?

WORDS: 345

SOURCE HTTP://WWW.GLAMOUR.COM/SEX-LOVE-LIFE/BLOGS/SMITTEN/2014/10/THE-DIFFERENCE-BETWEEN-GOOD-ON

VOCAB (testing-kr only): [L020B] GOOD ON PAPER_VOCAB

TO PRINT (testing-kr only): [L020B] GOOD ON PAPER

Discussion Questions

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. What does the author mean by “men who look good on paper don’t always look good in your life” (P1)?
  3. What kind of guys (or girls) do you fall for? Describe their looks, character, or any other traits you seek in your SO (significant other).
  4. Have you ever tried to date a “good on paper” guy and it didn’t work out? Was the “good for you” guy you dated also good on paper, or not so much?

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