FARMERS USING APP TO KEEP TRACK OF SHEEP

[TECHNOLOGY ★]

FARMERS USING APP TO KEEP TRACK OF SHEEP

a-flock-of-sheep-with-a-farmer-933396809

(P1) Two sheep farmers have started using smartphones to MONITOR and record their FLOCKS.

(P2) A new mobile phone app allows them to record everything from the weight of a lamb to the medicines it is being given, all without leaving the fields.

(P3) The Welsh government-funded project also works out when sheep are ready for market.

(P4) Huw and Guto Jones, who farm at Mallwyd, Gwynedd, and Llandre, Ceredigion, said it saves them time.

(P5) The brothers now carry detailed information about their 1,300 flock of sheep in their hand while SHEPHERDING in the fields.

(P6) “This new technology is A BREATH OF FRESH AIR,” said Huw Jones. “It has made the recording of sheep and lambs’ details so much easier and quicker.

(P7) “If a problem ARISES in the field with a lame EWE or a sick lamb, we can search for an ear tag number on the phone and find their medical history.

(P8) “The other advantage we’ve seen is that we can register and read electronic identification tags for our 800 Welsh mountain sheep at Talyglannau, and do exactly the same with the flock of sheep we have on our second farm Elgar in Llandre, Bow Street, even though we have no broadband connection there.”

WORDS: 212

SOURCE: http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-34211541

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. Do you use a lot of apps yourself, or not so many?
  3. Do you always buy the newest smartphone, or is an older model good enough for you?
  4. Would you allow yourself or your children to be MICROCHIPPED?
  5. Are apps anything more than information-organizing tools?

EXPRESSIONS TO PRACTICE:

What do the following expressions mean? Practice using each expression in a sentence; extra points if you can use it in conversation.

  • A breath of fresh air

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THE ARCHITECT WHO INSPIRED OUR LOVE OF COLUMNS

[CULTURE AND ENTERTAINMENT ★★★]

THE ARCHITECT WHO INSPIRED OUR LOVE OF COLUMNS

Andrea Palladio

(P1) Andrea Palladio – an Italian who lived 500 years ago – is one of the few architects whose style is recognised with an adjective in English. As a new exhibition opens in London, we explore the ENDURING popularity of “Palladianism”.

(P2) A world without Andrea Palladio’s legacy would be a “very depressing one”, says Charles Hind, chief CURATOR of collections at the Royal Institute of British Architects.

(P3) Hind has co-curated Palladian Design: The Good, The Bad and The Unexpected, which runs in London until January.

(P4) Palladio reinterpreted the architecture of ancient Rome for his own time, says Hind. He believed his flexible design principles could be applied to any type of building. From the grandest to the most HUMBLE. From an IMPOSING seat of government, to a country cowshed.

(P5) “Palladio introduced the concept that Roman architecture could be adapted to benefit all social classes,” says Hind, “and that’s one reason why his influence has remained more POTENT than any other architect.”

(P6) Born in 1508 in Padua in northern Italy, Andrea Palladio spent most of his adult life in the nearby city of Vicenza.

(P7) He trained as a stone-MASON initially, but his life was transformed when he worked for the humanist poet and scholar, Gian Giorgio Trissino, from 1538 to 1539. He was taken to Rome – which gave him the chance to study ancient RUINS.

(P8) During the Renaissance period, says Hind, very little was known about DOMESTIC architecture from the Roman Empire – much of it was yet to be discovered.

(P9) Palladio looked instead at ruins of the larger public buildings which were on show, and used this classical inspiration in his designs.

Palladio-Villa-La-Rocca-Pisana

(P10) Palladio became known for designing VILLAS and country houses for ARISTOCRATS in north-east Italy – with simplicity and SYMMETRY at the heart of each creation. His designs would have a central hall – with suites of rooms arranged around them.

(P11) He was also the first architect to integrate classical PORTICOS – covered COLUMNED PORCHES – into domestic housebuilding. Until then they had really only been used on religious buildings.

(P12) “Palladio reinvented the architecture of ANTIQUITY for contemporary use,” Hind says.

(P13) “He was enormously successful, extremely quickly.”

(P14) His first solo villa was built in 1540-1, but by 1545 there were documents showing demand from people wanting villas “alla Palladiana” – in the Palladian style.

(P15) More drawings survive from Palladio’s hand than all the other Italian Renaissance architects put together, thanks to two English collectors.

(P16) Inigo Jones and Lord Burlington transported them in two BATCHES at the start of the 17th and 18th Centuries.

(P17) And it is the presence of these drawings in England, argues Hind – plus Palladio’s book, The Four Books of Architecture – that were key to his long-term global influence.

st-pauls-church

(P18) It was Inigo Jones’s ADOPTION of Palladian PRINCIPLES that SPARKED a revolution in religious architecture. He designed St Paul’s in London’s Covent Garden, the first classical church in the UK. It was completed in 1633.

(P19) It RESEMBLES a Roman temple – with columns and a portico.

Chiswick-House-664

(P20) In the early 18th Century, when the second big collector of Palladio’s drawings – Richard Boyle the 3rd Earl of Burlington – designed Chiswick House in London, it is easy to see how his inspiration came from Palladio’s Villa Rotonda.

(P21) But in fact Chiswick House – which was built to store Lord Burlington’s collections rather than as somewhere to live – is more of a mix of styles, with Palladian symmetry, portico, and PEDIMENT, the most significant.

(P22) Palladian features soon became part of the standard REPERTOIRE of FASHIONABLE architecture of the time – now referred to as “Anglo-Palladianism”.

(P23) The theme spread west too. In the United States it was the main building style in the 40 years leading up to the American War of Independence.

(P24) Hundreds of architectural PATTERN BOOKS were published from the 1720s onwards.

(P25) Hind says many of them “stretched the definition of Palladianism – almost to the BREAKING POINT“. It meant people could MIX AND MATCH architectural ideas in the design of their own homes.

Mount Vernon

(P26) A country COTTAGE could have the same ELEMENTS as US President George Washington’s house at Mount Vernon in Virginia.

(P27) But, as ever with fashions, Palladian popularity in the UK and Ireland was not to last.

(P28) Victorians preferred more ELABORATE GOTHIC and classical Greek styles.

(P29) It took until the start of the 20th Century before there was a FULL-BLOWN RENAISSANCE of Andrea Palladio’s symmetrical concepts.

(P30) “Palladianism breathes permanence, DELIBERATION, and an OLYMPIAN calm,” says Hind. It suggests “we’re going to stay here”.

(P31) The Palladian revival continued through the 20th Century. In the UK it offered a way of keeping a sense of GRANDEUR, even when landowners were DOWNSIZING from a larger property.

(P32) Across the Atlantic, the USA has never really stopped using Palladianism as an architectural style.

(P33) “It gives people a sense of creating history,” says Hind.

Chadsworth Cottage

(P34) Palladio INCORPORATED elements of the Venetian local style into his architecture 500 years ago – and in the 21st Century, Chadsworth Cottage in North Carolina does the same.

(P35) Built on a coast PRONE to HURRICANES – where homes must be built on STILTS so that storm water can rush underneath – the stairs and wooden SLATS which hide the stilts supporting this house resemble the base of a temple or grand house.

WORDS: 884

SOURCE: http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-34143566

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. Describe the style of classic buildings in your country.
  3. What is your opinion of modern architecture?
  4. What was the last EXHIBIT you saw at a museum?
  5. Do you prefer living in a large house, a small house, or an apartment?

EXPRESSIONS TO PRACTICE:

What do the following expressions mean? Practice using each expression in a sentence; extra points if you can use it in conversation.

  • Breaking point
  • Mix and match
  • Full-blown

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TOKYO WINS LITTLE LEAGUE WORLD SERIES

[SPORTS ★]

TOKYO WINS LITTLE LEAGUE WORLD SERIES

Tokyo Little League

(P1) Tokyo, Japan’s, Little League players found themselves down by eight runs on Sunday, August 30. It was the first inning of the Little League championship game against Lewisberry, Pennsylvania. With more than 42,000 fans cheering on the home team on Sunday’s game in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, victory seemed OUT OF REACH.

(P2) Then team manager Junji Hidaka gathered his team to share encouraging words. “I told the players it doesn’t end until it ends,” Hidaka said through a translator. Tokyo went on to score seven runs in the second inning, four in the third inning, and five in the sixth inning. The team took home the Little League Baseball World Series championship title with a final score of 18-11.

(P3) Both Tokyo and Lewisberry scored on major plays. Tokyo’s Yugo Aoki hit a three-run homer in the second inning. Twin brothers Kengo and Shingo Tomita then hit one home run each. Lewisberry’s Dylan Rodenhaber scored a home run on his first hit of the TOURNAMENT, sending the ball SOARING over the right-field fence. Teammate Jaden Henline added a three-run homer as well.

(P4) “They just put the bat on the ball,” Lewisberry manager Tom Peifer said. “They hit pitches I’ve never seen kids, especially 12-year-olds, hit.”

(P5) The teams broke the previous Little League record of 23 combined runs in a CHAMPIONSHIP game. This record had stood since the 1947 championships. Lewisberry’s 10-run first inning was also a record, along with the team’s combined 30 hits during the game.

(P6) Tokyo’s overcoming an eight-run SHORTFALL was also the largest COMEBACK in any Little League World Series game. The team celebrated with a team HUDDLE near the pitcher’s mound.

(P7) Pennsylvania has won four previous World Series titles, most recently in 1960. With Tokyo’s comeback during the game, another victory for the state faded. “There are a lot of tears, even for myself, to know that the chance is over,” said Peifer after the team’s loss. “But we quickly told them, ‘When we leave here, let’s get the tears out, because there is nothing to be sad about.”

(P8) Members of Lewisberry’s Little League team returned to a proud HOMETOWN. Cheering fans lined the streets late on Sunday night as the team made its way to Red Land High School. They met there with local officials who congratulated the team on its hard work during the championships.

WORDS: 394

SOURCE: http://www.timeforkids.com/news/tokyo-wins-title/265356

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. Is baseball a popular sport in your country? Do you ever go to games yourself?
  3. Did you participate in any youth sports when you were growing up?
  4. Does international competition promote friendship or dislike among nations?
  5. What is your hometown? Do you still live there, or do you go back often to visit?

EXPRESSIONS TO PRACTICE:

What do the following expressions mean? Practice using each expression in a sentence; extra points if you can use it in conversation.

  • Out of reach

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QUEEN ELIZABETH II BECOMES GREAT BRITAIN’S LONGEST-REIGNING MONARCH

[WORLD NEWS ★★]

QUEEN ELIZABETH II BECOMES GREAT BRITAIN’S LONGEST-REIGNING MONARCH

Queen Elizabeth II

(P1) The United Kingdom’s Queen Elizabeth II marked the day she became the longest-serving MONARCH in her nation’s history – by doing her job.

(P2) On the day when she SURPASSED Queen Victoria, who served for 63 years and seven months on the throne, the beloved 89-year-old monarch carried on her ribbon-cutting ROUTINE as usual, traveling to open a new railroad in Scotland.

(P3) Elizabeth rode by train from the Scottish capital, Edinburgh, to Tweedbank in southern Scotland, where she opened the just-built Borders Railway.

(P4) The queen waved to crowds at Waverley Station in Edinburgh as she boarded a train bound for the opening ceremony. The arrival of her helicopter had been delayed by fog.

(P5) Elizabeth, who is concluding her usual summer vacation at Balmoral, her castle in Scotland, spoke briefly at the ceremony, telling the audience that her new title was “not one to which I have ever ASPIRED.”

(P6) Still, she was HEARTENED by the worldwide OUTPOURING of CONGRATULATIONS from the HIGH AND MIGHTY down to the small and slight.

(P7) “INEVITABLY a long life can pass by many MILESTONES — my own is no exception — but I thank you all and the many others at home and overseas for your TOUCHING messages of great kindness,” she said.

(P8) Elsewhere, the milestone was marked more definitively. In London, a FLOTILLA of historic vessels, leisure boats and FERRIES took part along the River Thames in central London. The HMS Belfast sounded a four-gun SALUTE.

(P9) And Prime Minister David Cameron told the nation that though the queen wanted the day to go on like any other, millions of Britons would be celebrating.

(P10) “While I rarely ADVOCATE disobeying Her Majesty, least of all in her own Parliament,” he said in speech at the House of Commons, “I do think it’s right today we should stop and take a moment as a nation to mark this historic milestone and to thank Her Majesty for the extraordinary service she’s given to our country over more than six decades.

(P11) “Over the last 63 years, Her Majesty has been a rock of stability in a world of constant change, and her selfless sense of service and duty has earned admiration not only in Britain, but right across the globe,” Cameron added.

(P12) A former prime minister, John Major, also praised the queen’s long REIGN as a comfort to Britons.

(P13) “Whilst prime ministers have come and gone, celebrities have come and gone, life has changed, she and the monarchy have been an absolute CONSTANT in their lives, and I think that is very reassuring,” he said.

(P14) British legislators planned to mark the milestone in Parliament and newspapers were filled with special TRIBUTES to the queen.

(P15) Buckingham Palace marked the event by releasing an official photograph of the queen taken by Mary McCartney, a photographer who is the daughter of former Beatle Paul McCartney.

(P16) Elizabeth came to the throne in 1952 upon the death of her father, King George VI. 

WORDS: 492

SOURCE: http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2015/09/09/queen-elizabeth-surpasses-queen-victoria-and-united-kingdoms-longest-serving-monarch/71921934/

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. Do you think that monarchy still has RELEVANCE in the modern world, or is it an OUTMODED form of government?
  3. Who are the most honored older citizens in your country?
  4. Do you believe that age brings WISDOM?
  5. ANGLOPHILIA is the love of all things English. Do you consider yourself an Anglophile?

EXPRESSIONS TO PRACTICE:

What do the following expressions mean? Practice using each expression in a sentence; extra points if you can use it in conversation.

  • High and mighty

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SADNESS MAKES YOUR WORLD LOOK GRAY

[LIFE ★]

SADNESS MAKES YOUR WORLD LOOK GRAY

Color Perception

(P1) The world seems DREARY, GLOOMY, and gray when you’re FEELING BLUE. In fact, being DOWN IN THE DUMPS might even affect how you perceive the color blue. A recent study about color was published in the journal Psychological Science. It shows a direct connection between a person’s ability to perceive color and their emotions.

(P2) Psychologists have long known that emotions can impact the way people perceive things. That’s in part because chemicals from your brain might affect how you process what you see. “Color is such an important part of our experience,” says lead author Christopher Thorstenson, a psychologist at the University of Rochester, in New York.

(P3) There’s a reason, he says, that sad people commonly describe the world as “colorless,” and “gray,” and happy people use words like “bright” and “colorful.”

(P4) In the experiment, the researchers randomly assigned people to one of two groups. People in the “sadness” group watched a sad scene from The Lion King. Those in the “AMUSEMENT” group watched a comedy SKIT. Another part of the study had people watch a NEUTRAL desktop screensaver.

(P5) Everyone was then asked to look at red, yellow, green, and blue patches that had been MUTED to a gray-ish color. “Some of the patches are pretty difficult [to make out],” Thorstenson admits. He says it takes some time to figure out their SHADE. People were scored on how accurate their color perception was. Then they completed an emotional EVALUATION.

(P6) The result? Sad people had a hard time seeing the difference between shades along the blue-yellow color AXIS. But people who were sad did not have problems seeing colors in the red-green SPECTRUM. Thorstenson says this could be the result of an evolutionary need to see red as an anger response.

(P7) Thorstenson says these results HIGHLIGHT the possible importance of dopamine in sight. Dopamine is a chemical that sends signals to the brain. Researchers are hoping to focus more on dopamine in the future. “We know dopamine is important in MOOD DISORDERS like depression and ADHD, but there might be something going on with how dopamine affects how we see colors, too,” Thorstenson says. “How we feel can really influence how we see the world around us,” he says.

WORDS: 374

SOURCE: http://www.timeforkids.com/news/sadness-turns-your-world-gray/269151

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. “Feeling blue” is a phrase for DEPRESSION. What emotions do you associate with colors?
  3. What is your favorite color? Do you like to dress in that color or design your home with it?
  4. COLOR BLINDNESS usually means the INABILITY to DISTINGUISH between certain colors (rather than not seeing color at all). Do you have any color blindness?
  5. If you are feeling low, how do you improve your mood?

EXPRESSIONS TO PRACTICE:

What do the following expressions mean? Practice using each expression in a sentence; extra points if you can use it in conversation.

  • Feel blue
  • Down in the dumps
  • Mood disorder
  • Color blindness

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SAN MIGUEL DE ALLENDE IS CULTURAL AND HISTORIC

[TRAVEL ★★]

SAN MIGUEL DE ALLENDE IS CULTURAL AND HISTORIC

A general view shows the 18th-century Canal House mansion, which is considered by UNESCO as an architectural masterpiece for its fusion of baroque and neoclassical architecture, in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, August 3, 2015. REUTERS/Walker Simon

(P1) With COBBLESTONE streets and no traffic lights, San Miguel de Allende has the look of a SLEEPY Mexican town.

(P2) But behind the colonial-era FACADES it HUMS with cultural activity. The town of about 80,000 people, barely three hours north of Mexico City, supports an estimated 120 fine art galleries and FOLK ART museums.

(P3) In 2008, UNESCO named San Miguel a World Heritage site, citing it as a CRADLE of Mexican independence and HIGHLIGHTING its INTEGRATION of architectural styles, from BAROQUE to neo-GOTHIC, within a 16th century Spanish colonial LAYOUT.

(P4) The city’s LANDMARK is the Parroquia church facade, with TWISTED lines, pointed arches, and sharp SPIRES said to be inspired by postcards of Gothic European cathedrals.

(P5) It stands opposite the Casa de las Conspiraciones, or Conspiracies House, where local NOTABLES plotted the launch of the Independence War against Spain.

(P6) An early INSURGENT leader was town NAMESAKE Ignacio Allende, and his home on the Jardin is an independence history museum.

(P7) Also on the Jardin is the Canal House mansion, considered by UNESCO as a masterpiece for FUSING the baroque and the NEOCLASSICAL.

(P8) An ECHO of Paris, one block away, is the Immaculate Conception Church’s dome, believed to be modeled on the Hotel des Invalides, where Napoleon is buried.

(P9) The MURALS at the next-door Bellas Artes feature an unfinished work by leading 20th century artist David Alfaro Siqueiros.

(P10) Across the street, Galeria Noel Cayetano specializes in contemporary Oaxacan art, which blends modern MOTIFS with native animal and spirit IMAGERY.

(P11) The style’s best-known PRACTITIONER, Francisco Toledo, is Mexico’s highest-priced living artist, with one painting selling for over $900,000.

(P12) Lower-priced Toledo ENGRAVINGS and Toledo-designed HOUSEWARES and jewelry are offered at Galeria Nudo, also focused on art from Oaxaca, a southern state with THRIVING Indian traditions and languages.

(P13) San Miguel’s biggest art HUB is the 40-gallery Fabrica La Aurora, a former TEXTILE MILL.

(P14) Often OVERLOOKED by visitors are folk art museums like the Mask Museum and the four-floor Mexican Popular Toy Museum, which includes many WHIMSICAL exhibits.

WORDS: 339

SOURCE: http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/09/04/us-travel-sanmigueldeallende-idUSKCN0R415O20150904

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. What is the most cultural and historic city in your country?
  3. Do different regions of your country have different artistic and cultural styles?
  4. Do you enjoy visiting museums? What kind?
  5. Do you ever buy art pieces for your home?

EXPRESSIONS TO PRACTICE:

What do the following expressions mean? Practice using each expression in a sentence; extra points if you can use it in conversation.

  • Folk art

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END ONLINE COMMENTS

[OPINION ★★★]

END ONLINE COMMENTS

Online Comments

(P1) It shouldn’t be a surprise that I’m not fond of comments sections. I think you’d be HARD-PRESSED to find many female writers who are. On most sites – from YouTube to local newspapers – comments are a place where the most NOXIOUS thoughts rise to the top and smart conversations are lost in a sea of garbage.

(P2) There’s a reason, after all, that the REFRAIN “don’t read the comments” has become UBIQUITOUS among journalists. But if we’re not to read them, why have them at all?

(P3) I wasn’t always a comments-hater. When I started a feminist blog in 2004, I was thrilled to finally be able to talk with other young feminists online and was open to chatting with DETRACTORS. I saw the comments section as a way to DESTABILIZE the traditional writer/reader relationship – no longer did audiences need to consume an article without a true opportunity to respond. Comments even made my writing better those days; FEEDBACK from readers BROADENED the way I thought and sometimes changed my mind.

(P4) But as the internet and audiences grew, so did the BILE. Now if feels as if comments UPHOLD power structures instead of SUBVERTING them: sexism, racism, and homophobia are the norm; THREATS and HARASSMENT are common.

(P5) For writers, wading into comments doesn’t make a lot of sense – it’s like working a second shift where you WILLINGLY subject yourself to attacks from people you have never met and hopefully never will. Especially if you are a woman. Male commenters frequently threaten female journalists.

(P6) My own EXHAUSTION with comments these days has less to do with that kind of EXPLICIT harassment, which more responsible publications quickly delete, and more with the NEVER-ENDING stream of DERISION that women, PEOPLE OF COLOR, and other MARGINALIZED communities ENDURE; the constant insistence that you or what you write is stupid or that your PLATFORM is UNDESERVED. Yes, I’m sure straight, white, male writers get this kind of response too – but it’s not nearly as often and not nearly as nasty.

(P7) I don’t much understand the appeal of comments for readers either. Outside of the few places that have rich and intelligent conversation in comments, what is the point of engaging in DEBATE where the best you can hope for are a few PATS ON THE BACK from strangers for that PITHY ONE-LINER? Isn’t that what Facebook or Twitter is for?

(P8) When tech news website Re/code shut down its comments section last year, editors CITED the growth of social media as one reason for the decision: “The BULK of discussion of our stories is increasingly taking place there, making onsite comments less and less used and less and less useful.”

(P9) Comments sections also give the impression that all thoughts are created equal when, well, they’re not. When Popular Science stopped publishing comments, for example, it was because “everything, from evolution to the origins of climate change, is mistakenly thought to be UP FOR GRABS again…scientific certainty is just another thing for two people to ‘debate’”. When will we see the humanity and dignity of women as a fact, rather than an opinion?

(P10) It’s true, I could just stop reading comments. But I shouldn’t have to. Ignoring hateful things doesn’t make them go away, and telling women to simply avoid comments is just another way of saying we’re too lazy or OVERWHELMED to fix the real problem.

(P11) Websites and news sources are increasingly moving forward without comments because they find them unnecessary and COUNTER-PRODUCTIVE. More places should FOLLOW THEIR LEAD.

WORDS: 584

SOURCE: http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/sep/10/end-online-comments

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

If you found the passage difficult to read or had problems understanding specific words or idiomatic expressions, please discuss them with your tutor. The following discussion questions should be answered in your own words and with your own arguments.

  1. Briefly summarize the content of the article in your own words.
  2. Do you agree or disagree with the idea of ending online comments sections?
  3. Do you ever comment on online articles yourself? Do you read other people’s comments?
  4. Do you use Facebook and Twitter or similar social media platforms to express your opinions?
  5. Many people make unpleasant comments ANONYMOUSLY. Would forcing people to use their real names online change their behaviors?

EXPRESSIONS TO PRACTICE:

What do the following expressions mean? Practice using each expression in a sentence; extra points if you can use it in conversation.

  • Hard-pressed
  • Never-ending
  • People of color
  • Pat on the back
  • One-liner
  • Up for grabs
  • Counter-productive
  • Follow the lead

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